We recently reviewed a new book entitled "11v11" by C.I. DeMann which was the very first book we reviewed in the "Fictional Oral History genre, we didn't know such a genre existed but it was a lot of fun to read review.  

“11v11” by C.I. DeMann is an entertaining fictional oral history of two girl soccer teams. In the beginning of the book, the author explained the US although considered second rate in soccer (we call it football in NZ), has 1.6 million girls registered with the US Soccer Federation – more than all other countries combined – which was unbeknownst to me (and, I guess, many others as well). In view of this fact, I began reading the story with some enthusiasm to see why soccer is so popular with girls. I wasn’t disappointed.

I won’t spoil this great story by going into too much detail, but want to let you know the sports action (reads like you are on the field playing as well), is first rate with the heartaches, on field fights, yellow cards, twists and turns, and a great Championship game with a reflex goal by Estefania after an amazing “super slow motion” corner kick during regulation play which leads to a unique dramatic shootout.

I liked the way the author expressed the thoughts of the players during the tense shootout - very intriguing. It was very entertaining to read the thoughts and emotions of the coaches and players on each team.

I haven’t read oral fiction stories before, and I’m very glad this book caught my attention, as I found it a very enjoyable, unique, and refreshing change.

Needless to say, if you get a chance and want to learn what goes through the minds of these young sportswomen, give this book a read, especially if you are a soccer coach in the US or a footballer anywhere else in the world. You won't regret it and it's a quick read too.  

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I liked the “The Beyond Now Device” by Mark Hollock. In my opinion, not only is it a very imaginative and intelligent analysis of time, death, the future, free will, predestination, and other concepts but an extremely well-written tale. 

In the book’s introduction, the author acknowledges input from various Physics Departments of major universities on complex time issues and concepts of continuous time “between this now and the next.” Yet, I was amused the story began with a simple poem (which now has much more meaning to me) from Dr. Suess:

“How did it get to be so late so soon?

It’s night before it’s afternoon.

December is here before it’s June.

My goodness how the time has flewn.

How did it get so late so soon?” -- Dr. Seuss

The first chapters easily hook you in when the characters pick up Uncle Bill’s package which has a very unique atomizer in it and the spray sends the inhaler of the spray into the future to witness brief but very dramatic and amazing events which put me on the edge of my seat only to be immediately returned to the present. As time passes, these events draw nearer.

An entertaining and thought-provoking read. Even though calling a book a “page turner” has become cliched, I thought this extremely entertaining book made an excellent example to me of why books are called “page-turners.” Brilliantly done!"


A review of a new book just out "Reason and Unreason in Western Philosophy: The Struggle of Certainty against Probability through History: A Layman's Notes on Philosophy by Dr. Laszlo Hopp"

Albert Einstein said, “The definition of genius is taking the complex and making it simple.” That is what this book does. I sincerely enjoyed reading "Reason and Unreason in Western Philosophy: The Struggle of Certainty against Probability through History: A Layman's Notes on Philosophy,” written by Dr. Laszlo Hopp, an extremely intelligent pediatrician who wrote a comprehensive and easy to understand analysis of the great minds in philosophy. 

In the author’s “General Notes” in Foreword of the book Dr. Hopp’s explains his purpose in writing this book,

“The nerve of me…. Being but a simple admirer of philosophy armed with nothing but a medical degree and a curious mind, I couldn’t have possibly aimed at opening the door to scholarly deliberations. Instead, the book is meant to reveal the path a layman took while attempting to reconcile his personal experience in life with the philosophical thoughts of millennia.”

As I read this book, I formed an opinion this author did an amazing and excellent explanation over the next 500+ fascinating pages of the greatest philosophers who ever lived since Thales (624 -526 BC – The Seed of Materialism) to John Dewey (1859 – 1952 – Truth is Outcome Itself; Our Limitless Power) and, of course, Jean-Paul Sartre.

As I read this book, the author became the lead character and guide through the philosophies of humankind. Although I have never met this writer, I felt I really became to know him and admired his neutral but intricate reviews as he went on from ancient  history step by step to 20th Century Trends in Philosophy, such as the political philosophy of Professor John Rawls, who taught at Harvard for 40 years and inspired many other well-known philosophers. I felt the some of the philosophical ideas of John Rawls are appropriate and remedial for today’s confusing and troubled world. The author writes:

“Rawls fell into…(an) appreciation of liberal democracy which had its roots in the social system promoted by Locke, Mill, and Kant: a…society where people freely choose their representatives and … participate in every aspect of the political procedure.”

I keep this book as a reference and a guide to the great minds of past and present, and as a wonderful way to reconcile your own life and feel good about it.


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I enjoyed reading “Motorbikes and Camels” by Nejoud Al-Yagout, a brilliant and very talented Kuwait writer (who is also a poet and essayist).  The author shows us her genius in her first novel of intriguing and thought-provoking stories showing the interactions of men and women in individual stories in this excellent novel.

She shows the reader the innermost nature, philosophies, viewpoints, intentions, desires, extreme passions, extreme dislikes, complex and simple personalities, and the blatant and silent intentions of each person. She describes them very well along with their background and culture. This extremely well-crafted novel is well designed as I found myself constantly entwined in the highly emotional relationships and breakups as well as each person’s search for happiness.  

The author poses the question on the back cover of her work, “Am I who I am because of my culture?” She answers that question very well as she boldly bares each person’s soul and true nature leaving the reader extremely entertained yet pensive about the true nature and background of people and life itself.  

I am going to read the book a second time since I enjoyed it so much and I especially enjoyed the warm and spiritual ending and the character Salma, “a soul on the verge of awakening.”  Highly recommended!






5 Stars "A Bold Frank and Fearless Description of Amazing Events of an Incredibly Full Life."


"Christian Title's "Climbed the Hill" is an amazing true life story and is one of the most moving personal accounts I have ever read. The writer bares his soul and takes you on an unbelievable journey and transformation of a boy of average beginnings to a multi million dollar successful artist. His story is uplifting in a way you don’t expect - the reader pauses many times to reflect about what was just read.

 

Written with a remarkable touch of humor which keeps the reader fascinated and eager to see what the next turn of events will bring, the author doesn't hide anything but gives a bold, frank and fearless description of the amazing events of his incredibly full life.


A great read which I found difficult to put down, this memoir would make an intriguing and heart-warming movie. A human life is not always coherent and easily explained but you understand his actions clearly.


The story covers the Art World, his talented performances as a singer in Paris night clubs, sailing the world and much more including "those wonderful creatures called women" some extremely famous and very well known. As a legacy, Mr. Title is planning a multi million dollar a new art center and museum featuring his works,his extensive collection of American impressionist paintings, and international exhibits along with studios for aspiring artists."

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Type your paragraph here.

Wayne Willson’s “Time Particle: Sophie's Story (Volume 1)” is a brilliant dark humor- satire set in the year 2131. I hadn’t read a book that made me laugh so hard since reading Joseph Heller’s “Catch 22” many years ago. 
 
I laughed until I cried when I read this hysterically funny book. It started off a bit rough for me, since I thought the book was going to be pure science fiction and didn’t expect to be humorous.  The story is about various villains chasing the brilliant Sophie (“It’s not paranoia if they really are after you”) who discovered the secret to time travel, and the villains want her time travel secrets. The villains chase and kidnap her, and JoJo is out to save her along with a cast of amazing, amusing, and uproariously funny characters, with many changing scenes leading up to a great “let’s get Junior” (one of the villains) climax ending. 

My favorite character was a severely stern faced mother named Hattie, who could shoot such grave looks that would “make a dead man sweat,” or “turn Satan into a saint.”  I enjoyed the way the good characters on the brink of defeat turned the situation around giving retribution to greedy villains – especially how Margot, the gorgeous female robot, dealt with Junior.  Marty the monkey was amazing as well.  Greedy, backstabbing James hilariously got what he deserved in the converter machine scene. I could go on and on but I don’t want to give too much detail since I don’t want to spoil anything.

I was sad to see the book end so I’m going to read it again and will be looking forward to reading the sequel.

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I liked “I Hear You: The Surprisingly Simple Skill Behind Extraordinary Relationships” and when I first began reading this book, I noticed there were already 31 reviews of this book and all of them were 5 stars? Very unusual, I thought, since there were zero 4 star or less reviews? WTF? Especially after 31 out of 31 people took time out to write 5-star reviews for this valuable and enlightening book.

The book reads like Dale Carnegie’s timeless, “How to Win Friends and Influence People” – plain common sense and logical thoughts on how to really reach people and influence them.

The simple concept of validation, or truly understanding another’s emotions and validating those feelings leads to a strong connection with people.  The author, like Dale Carnegie, has a unique power to communicate common sense principles to teach us how to understand and validate another’s feeling in a nonjudgmental way and get along with others. He’s not overly scientific and doesn’t ever present himself as a “Psychological know it all.” 

The author is a sincere person trying to share with the reader what he believes is an amazing way of understanding and communicating with people to make them feel better about their situation. I totally agree with him and his views on validation need more attention.  Everyone on earth might be better off after reading this book.

Even though this might not be appropriate for what the author is communicating in this book, I challenge the author to comment to this review on how he thinks President Trump should handle Kim Jong-un.  Should Trump say, “I understand you have your own country, your own borders, and you have the right to try and defend yourself as much as you can, and certainly, I would feel the same as you do if Russia or China said the USA could no longer have nuclear weapons….”

I’m not being facetious. I think this author is on to something valuable as a way to open important communications between leaders of countries whose actions affect many people. In any event, this book certainly teaches how to intelligently deal with people and I liked it very much.

Well done, Mr. Sorenson and I was surprised to learn this is your first book and I sincerely hope there will be more to come. 

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SOME EXAMPLES OF OUR FREE BOOK REVIEWS 

5 Stars!
I liked “I Hear You: The Surprisingly Simple Skill Behind Extraordinary Relationships” and when I first began reading this book, I noticed there were already 31 reviews of this book and all of them were 5 stars? Very unusual, I thought, since there were zero 4 star or less reviews? WTF? Especially after 31 out of 31 people took time out to write 5-star reviews for this valuable and enlightening book.

The book reads like Dale Carnegie’s timeless, “How to Win Friends and Influence People” – plain common sense and logical thoughts on how to really reach people and influence them.

The simple concept of validation, or truly understanding another’s emotions and validating those feelings leads to a strong connection with people. The author, like Dale Carnegie, has a unique power to communicate common sense principles to teach us how to understand and validate another’s feeling in a nonjudgmental way and get along with others. He’s not overly scientific and doesn’t ever present himself as a “Psychological know it all.”

The author is a sincere person trying to share with the reader what he believes is an amazing way of understanding and communicating with people to make them feel better about their situation. I totally agree with him and his views on validation need more attention. Everyone on earth might be better off after reading this book.

Even though this might not be appropriate for what the author is communicating in this book, I challenge the author to comment to this review on how he thinks President Trump should handle Kim Jong-un. Should Trump say, “I understand you have your own country, your own borders, and you have the right to try and defend yourself as much as you can, and certainly, I would feel the same as you do if Russia or China said the USA could no longer have nuclear weapons….”

I’m not being facetious. I think this author is on to something valuable as a way to open important communications between leaders of countries whose actions affect many people. In any event, this book certainly teaches how to intelligently deal with people and I liked it very much.

Well done, Mr. Sorenson and I was surprised to learn this is your first book and I sincerely hope there will be more to come.

***

I extremely enjoyed reading R. J. Eastwood’s, “Autopsy of the Planet Earth.” I liked the way the book began with the first two chapters which interested me to some extent, and I wasn’t really hooked until I got to the introduction of a 4-foot, grey alien named, “Legna” (yes, that’s Angel spelled backwards), in the upcoming pages, and couldn’t put it down after that.

The story was unique, intelligently written, and showed the irony of earth’s society, and the human race. Lots of politics, human nature, and social issues are in this story.  It will make you think more about the future.

The author tells the story at a fast pace - like a Dan Brown novel. Yet, this story is more thought provoking, in my opinion. It provokes thinking about concepts we seldom think about, yet these concepts, in my opinion, seem essential to a well-balanced life philosophy. For example, one of my favorite concepts brought out was the alien's answer to the question on who the creator was and the nature of religions -- it was more of a matter of when the creatures become the creator.

Finally, I found I was expecting the unexpected when I read this book, and I am following this author now. He is an excellent writer with an excellent mind.

Very well done!

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